These memorandums are often directed towards the gaze of those who believe that their principles have not been respected according to the Federation. Numerous requests have been made for revisions to the 20-point memorandum to reflect social, economic and political changes over time. [4] About two weeks after the announcement, Sabahan Donald Stephens convened a meeting of political leaders in northern Borneo, who developed a 14-point program with minimum requirements. These were then increased to 20 points. A commission of inquiry headed by Lord Cameron Cobbold and the Lansdowne Committee, an intergovernmental committee, have been appointed to assist in the development of the Malaysian agreement. Lord Lansdowne served for Great Britain and Tun Abdul Razak, Deputy Prime Minister of the Federation of Malaya, for Malaya. [1] The 18 points were based on the Nine Cardinal Principles of the domination of english Rajah. [2] [3] A similar memorandum, called a 20-point agreement, was developed and presented by Borneo North. The 18-point agreement often serves as a focal point for those who claim that Sarawak`s rights within the Federation have been eroded over time, such as Sabah. This 20-point agreement is fundamental to “the relationship and respect for the corresponding rights for Sarawak and Sabah.” One way or another, after 45 years, the federal government began to ignore the agreement and even changed the “rules” without the agreement of Sarawak and Sabah. Many calls have been made for a revision of the agreement to reflect social, economic and political changes over time. All this is correct in Malaya, but for Sarawak, the detachment should be sensitive to the 20-point agreement. The zeal for national integration must be present, but it must be implemented in the proper respect of the agreement.

In January 1962, the British government, in collaboration with the Federation of the Malaya Government, appointed a commission of inquiry on northern Borneo and Sarawak to determine whether the people supported the proposal for the creation of a Malaysian federation. The five-person team of two Malayans and three British representatives was led by Lord Cobbold. [2] The Lansdowne Committee was established to draft the final details of the Malaysian agreement. Lord Lansdowne served for Great Britain and Tun Abdul Razak, Deputy Prime Minister of the Federation of Malaya. [3] The agreements, which are contained in the proclamation of Malaysia and in the cobbold commission reports, have defined the conditions and rights that should protect the autonomy and special interest of the people of Sabah and Sarawak, including by protecting the rights of these regions to religion, language, education, administration, economy and culture.